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Join Our Research Team at DMA 2014
Nov 02, 2010
Article

New Chart: Perceptions of Email Marketing at Budget Time

SUMMARY: We asked nearly 1,500 email marketers how email marketing is perceived by their organizations at budget time. In this week's chart, we'll provide the responses, from those who view email as affordable, to those that perceive email as a powerful tool worthy of an increased investment.
by Jeff Rice, Research Analyst

Attitudes About Email Marketing at Budget Time

View Chart Online
Click here to see a larger, printable version of this chart

When it comes to budgeting, those involved in the process -- from email marketers to CEOs -- demonstrate a healthy respect for the value of email marketing.

The attitudes and opinions of email marketing range from simply being a good tool, to being a powerful tool worthy of investment for two-thirds of the marketers and decision-makers who influence budget spending.

Overall, small organizations are much more likely to think that "email is cheap and still working" than large organizations. Conversely, large organizations are more likely to believe that "email is a good tool in the toolbox and is inexpensive, so we bump it up a few percent each year" than their smaller counterparts.

Organizations maintaining email lists of fewer than 5,000 names tend to think email is inexpensive because, for them, it probably is. However when you increase the size of the list, you also add to the complexity and expense of managing issues, such as deliverability and spam control, which forces additional investment.

For additional research data and insights about email marketing, download and read the free Executive Summary from the MarketingSherpa 2010 Email Marketing Benchmark Report.

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