Close
Join 237,000 weekly readers and receive practical marketing advice for FREE.
MarketingSherpa's Case Studies, New Research Data, How-tos, Interviews and Articles

Enter your email below to join thousands of marketers and get FREE weekly newsletters with practical Case Studies, research and training, as well as MarketingSherpa updates and promotions.

 

Please refer to our Privacy Policy and About Us page for contact details.

No thanks, take me to MarketingSherpa

First Name:
Last Name:
Email:
Text HTML
Jun 09, 2008
Blog Post

SherpaBlog: Branding vs A/B Testing

SUMMARY: No summary available.
By Anne Holland, Founder

I’ve worked for brand-driven companies and for A/B test-driven companies. Each was equally snooty and disdainful of the other.

To summarize, brand marketers thought A/B testers were pointy-headed geeks, while A/B testers thought brand marketers were bubble-headed blondes. Luckily, the twain didn’t often meet ... until now.

Instead of relying on “fuzzy” data from focus groups, awareness studies and Nielsen ratings, brand marketers now are inundated with detailed numbers from every campaign that touches the Web, email or mobile in some way. Once you have numbers, testing to improve results is the logical next step.

As for A/B testers, the plethora of cheap, do-it-yourself online response vehicles has lowered the barriers to competition. Now anyone can launch a direct response campaign to your marketplace without first investing hundreds of thousands of dollars in printing, postage, fulfillment and media costs. Suddenly, a strong brand is the only safe harbor to launch your merchant ships from.

In practical terms, this means political battles are beginning to rage in marketing departments across America. Whichever side you’re on -- brand vs A/B -- someone else on your team is evangelizing the other direction as the best way to beat the recession.

Who’s right and who’s wrong? Hate to say it, especially as a chief proponent of measurement in marketing, but brand should always win.

Brand is so critical, in fact, that every company must assign a Chief Brand Evangelist who has *veto power* over any and all proposed A/B test ideas. Test all you want, but never test outside of brand guidelines ... unless you are considering changing your entire brand positioning as a result and the CEO has been brought into the picture.

It's that serious.

You see, I’ve worked for A/B testing companies and brand-driven companies. The brand-driven companies could sell almost anything within their brand far more easily than the testing companies could. The brand’s fans would line up to buy anything that brand had going. You could A/B test your brains out from here to kingdom come, but all those incremental gains year after year would never add up to the sole selling power of a strong brand.

Of course, the gold is having a strong brand with a team that’s able to A/B test, within guidelines, to improve results for it. That’s a company worth investing in.

Comments about this Blog Entry

Jun 09, 2008 - Jon Dale of Wayfinder Response Marketing says:
We've been working at integrating brand with response marketing for years. The disciplines require distinctly different, if not mutually exclusive, skill sets. You're right about brand's precedence (although many successful brands have been built with direct response A/B mentalities). I think that the A/B testers have to embrace big ideas in order to achieve true marketing breakthroughs. Once you get into an A/B testing mentality, there's a tendency to follow "best practices" to beat control packages. Big ideas are just too risky. I hope to see more about this increasingly important issue.


Jun 09, 2008 - Tom Asacker of acleareye.com says:
Finally! A smart, well-written and balanced article on marketing and branding. Kudos Anne!



Post a Comment

Note: Comments are lightly moderated. We post all comments without editing as long as they
(a) relate to the topic at hand,
(b) do not contain offensive content, and
(c) are not overt sales pitches for your company's own products/services.










To help us prevent spam, please type the numbers
(including dashes) you see in the image below.*

Invalid entry - please re-enter




*Please Note: Your comment will not appear immediately --
article comments are approved by a moderator.