Close
Join 237,000 weekly readers and receive practical marketing advice for FREE.
MarketingSherpa's Case Studies, New Research Data, How-tos, Interviews and Articles

Enter your email below to join thousands of marketers and get FREE weekly newsletters with practical Case Studies, research and training, as well as MarketingSherpa updates and promotions.

 

Please refer to our Privacy Policy and About Us page for contact details.

No thanks, take me to MarketingSherpa

First Name:
Last Name:
Email:
Text HTML
Join Our Research Team at DMA 2014
Feb 19, 2007
Blog Post

Rough Stats on Email Conversions From 'Reply To's' Versus Clickthroughs

SUMMARY: No summary available.
By Anne Holland, President

If you want to improve email campaign conversions -- at least incrementally -- the answer may lie in your customer service department. Here's why:

Every time you send an email broadcast, instead of clicking on hotlinks or order buttons, some percent of recipients will click on "reply to" and send you back a message.

What percent? Sherpa Reader Don Hoyt at Deerfield.com (who admittedly is in the business of helping companies handle these replies) says his own house mailings get 20% replies for big offers and 5% for non-offer messages, such as informational newsletters. That sounds a little high to me, but it probably varies a lot based on the quality of your list, your marketplace and your relationship opt-ins. Hoyt's list is B-to-B and includes customers.

Campaign replies fall into roughly four topical groups:

o Questions/response about the offer in the email - lion's share
o Questions about buying your other offerings - 10%
o Technical or service questions about past purchases - 10%
o Email preferences (i.e., Take me off your list) - tiny %

Hoyt's customer service team has a goal of personally responding to all these replies within 30 minutes of receipt. Their conversion rate from answers to the first two reply topics is 30%.

30% is a darn high close rate on an emailed offer.

So, you might consider a quick research project. Reply four times (once per topic above) to one of your own email promotions as if you were a "real" recipient. This will work best if you use a personal email account so it's not obvious that you're with the company.

Then sit back and see how long it takes customer service to reply to each and what's in that reply when it comes.

If it's gloriously and swiftly handled, give them very public kudos at the next interdepartmental meeting. If it's not, don't blame them. Instead, start a research program of your own to find out:

o What percent of campaign sends get reply-tos?

o How do the replies break down into topics by percent?

o How long does your email program or ESP take to sort these and get them back to your company for handling? (It can be as long as two days.) What would it take to speed this up?

o Who at your company receives them now and what training and tools has marketing given them?

o What about reply-tos for rented lists, affiliate campaigns or other partnered sends?

Your goal is to estimate how many possible conversions you're currently leaving on the table due to slowly answered or uncompellingly answered replies. And how much would it cost you to fix the problem.

You may discover that handling reply-tos will continue to be imperfect. The conversions won't be worth the extra work. Or you may find that you can optimize right away.

By the way -- I had a meeting with our own ESP on Friday on this very subject, so I've just started my own research project into this same thing for Sherpa. We'll see how it turns out.

Comments about this Blog Entry

Mar 18, 2007 - Mike Volpe of HubSpot says:
There are definitely some gems in the "reply-to's". In my experience, especially for small businesses, the rate is usually high enough to warrant a little effort to make sure you review them. However for large businesses, it is much more difficult because the sheer volume can be overwhelming and a lot of the email software systems (still) don't allow you to easily separate the genuine replies from the out of office and other bouncebacks.



Post a Comment

Note: Comments are lightly moderated. We post all comments without editing as long as they
(a) relate to the topic at hand,
(b) do not contain offensive content, and
(c) are not overt sales pitches for your company's own products/services.










To help us prevent spam, please type the numbers
(including dashes) you see in the image below.*

Invalid entry - please re-enter




*Please Note: Your comment will not appear immediately --
article comments are approved by a moderator.