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Jan 08, 2007
Blog Post

Quick -- Check Your Site & Email Newsletters' Copyright

SUMMARY: No summary available.
By Anne Holland, President

Did you forget? Nearly every year I do until about mid-February. ... The year has changed, so you need to update your Web site and email newsletter templates so the copyright line reads (c) 2007, org name. In my experience, the Web and email team often forget to do this until someone in marketing sounds the alarm bell.

How much does updating the copyright year really matter? Well, I suppose Legal will tell you it's a help if they have to go after someone who rips off your content. My main focus is marketing though, and I just think old copyrights look lame. Especially for lesser-known brands where surfers may have found you via hotlinks from other sites or search engines.

If someone trips over your site during a search and never heard of you before, there is a chance they'll scroll down to your copyright to see how long you've been around -- if you're for real. A copyright reading (c) 1998-2007 is inherently more trustworthy than one that reads (c) 2004-2005.

OK, so having written this I now have to scamper around Sherpa offices making sure we've updated our stuff, too.

Comments about this Blog Entry

Jan 08, 2007 - Larry Czerwonka of buzztone says:
No one should need to be reminded to check something that is so easily automated. ... We come back to work Jan. 2nd, and all copyright notices on all our sites and across any new emails that we send out show 2007 (on the Web sites they update from whatever year the site launched to 2007). If you need to do a simple task like copyright notices, what else are you doing manually that should be automated?


Jan 09, 2007 - Christian Vanek of SurveyGizmo says:
I discovered a little trick a few years ago. Your website guy can add half a line of code that automatically keeps your website's copyright up-to-date. I agree with Anne, nothing is more lame than an expired copyright.


Jan 11, 2007 - Bobbi Jo Woods of B. Woods Design says:
I don't think having a "certain date" on your copyright notice is relevant when it comes to websites having credibility. I don't think about that when I see a copyright year on a website. I figure it has more to do with the date of publication rather than whether someone is 'for real' or lends/lacks any credibility. I think being credible has more to do with your content and the fact that you have a reliable means of being contacted through the website, and that you answer any messages that come through that point of contact. Just my $.02. I'm sure most in my field would agree.


Jan 12, 2007 - Ed Henrich of Analyticus.net says:
Agree that you should fix it and it is easy to do so. Here's one for you, I use the "high end" bloging software Movable Type. Copyright © 2001-2005 Six Apart. :-)



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