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Sep 25, 2003
Article

Why you should never run an ad just once

SUMMARY: By Managing Editor Anne HollandAlthough we normally write all our articles in-house, this Monday I saw such a useful piece in the Media Buying Academy's newsletter that I phoned up President Lee White Morrow and asked for her permission to run it here.Yes, I think it absolutely applies to online - in fact it matches data in some of our past Case Studies of online and ezine ads:"To throw one message out there, and expect a response is ludicrous.Frequency is required in order to create a need or a desire for the consumer to buy. Studies over the years have...
By Managing Editor Anne Holland

Although we normally write all our articles in-house, this Monday I saw such a useful piece in the Media Buying Academy's newsletter that I phoned up President Lee White Morrow and asked for her permission to run it here.

Yes, I think it absolutely applies to online - in fact it matches data in some of our past Case Studies of online and ezine ads:

"To throw one message out there, and expect a response is ludicrous.

Frequency is required in order to create a need or a desire for the consumer to buy. Studies over the years have shown that, in broadcast advertising:

The first time someone sees or hears an advertising message, it goes in one ear and out the other. People say to themselves, "So what!"

The second time someone sees or hears an advertising message in a week, they say to themselves, "Oh yeah. I've seen or heard that before." There is an air of familiarity about the message.

The third time someone hears or sees that same advertising message in a week, they say to themselves, "Do I have a need or desire to buy that product or service?"

Every exposure after the third exposure in a week, is considered to be a repeat of the third up to the 10th exposure. Each time, the viewer or listener is asking themselves, "Do I have a need or desire to buy that product or service?"

During the 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th exposure, in a week, the prospect is no longer asking themselves, "Do I have a need or a desire to buy that product or service?" They have, in their own minds, already addressed that question and have answered it. In essence, the advertising is null and void. It results in no conscious action being taken on the part of the prospect.

The ad dollars are essentially wasted.

Once the prospect has been subjected to the 15th exposure in a week, the prospect has crossed over into "the irritant zone." By now, the advertising is creating an adverse effect, becoming annoying, and obnoxious to the viewer or listener.

15 or more exposures to a prospect during a one week period of time is considered a "danger zone." This annoyance can become so bothersome, the prospective consumer can develop a "dislike" or a "hatred" for the product or service, and the advertiser can count on not getting them as a customer - ever!"

Note - if you'd like to learn more about Media Buying Academy, go to
http://www.mediabuyingacademy.com

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